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Hi.

Welcome to my blog. I talk about body positivity, style, inspiration, social justice, and whatever the hell else is on my mind.

Lane Bryant #ImNoAngel Campaign Misses the (Stretch) Mark

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Lane Bryant's #ImNoAngel campaign has gotten lots of attention for its recent diss on Victoria's Secret's long-time angels ads. But is it really that different from it's straight size counterpart? Um, not really. Why are we so damn excited that six flawless plus models who have been photoshopped to death are representing the plus size woman? The bodies in that advertisement are young, have round butts, smooth thighs and not a stretch mark in sight. The message it sends is that there is a very specific non-thin body that is ok to have. It has all the markings of the Dove's Real Beauty ad from 8 years ago, which in my opinion lacked body diversity too.

dove-models-real-beauty

Haven't we come further than that? I hoped we had.

It still remains in the hands of grassroots body positive advocates to push the envelope and fight for inclusivity in the real sense of the word.

The #ImNoAngel campaign is a watered down attempt to make big girls feel good about themselves. But no one in that ad could have been bigger than a size 18. That leaves out a very important cross-section of Lane Bryant's customer base. They carry sizes 14-28. Why aren't the models in the campaign representative of that diversity?

In a news release, Lane Bryant says its campaign aims to "celebrate women of all shapes and sizes by redefining society’s traditional notion of sexy with a powerful core message: ALL women are sexy."  Sorry LB, the message did NOT come across that way. You forgot to include women who wear a size 18 or bigger, or who have stretch marks, or cellulite, or any number of so called imperfections.

I can't be the only woman of size who yearns to see herself reflected in a lingerie ad with fat, dimpled models. I give credit to companies like Curvy Girl Lingerie, who use models of different sizes on their website. It is seeing those images over and over that will really help us to get over our society's hatred of fat bodies.

curvy girl model2

So excuse me for not being grateful to Lane Bryant for this mediocre attempt to be inclusive. As a company that has served plus size women since 1923, I expected more.

People may accuse me of being harsh, but we are in a time of great change, and I think companies like Lane Bryant often get credit for the work that body positive activists have been doing for years. And frankly, their version lacks the kind of progress we so desperately need.

I challenge Lane Bryant and other mainstream plus size clothing brands to really think outside the box. They can be agents of real change if they so choose. The time is now. The only question is, will they take the leap?

xo

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